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Humanities

Course Descriptions:

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS GR 9
(ENGR1F) – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Grade 8 Language Arts
Content: In Grade 9 English Language Arts, students will begin to form critical and analytical responses, and meet prescribed curriculum outcomes as specified by the province:
• Exploring thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences
• Comprehending and responding personally to oral, literary and media texts
• Managing ideas and information
• Enhancing the clarity and artistry of communication
• Celebrating and building community 
 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS GR 10
(ENGR2F) – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Grade 9 English Language Arts
Content: Students will develop skill in their use of the language arts which includes: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing. Students study the language arts in order to function in their communities and cultures by learning to appreciate, enjoy, communicate, interact, identify, solve problems, think critically, and make informed choices. Topics that will be covered are the development of reading and writing skills, critical thinking, visual literacy, public speaking, and career education.
 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS: LITERARY FOCUS GR 11
(ENGL3S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Grade 10 English Language Arts
Content: This specialized course focuses on the aesthetic (“literary”) uses of language: to enlighten, to foster understanding and sympathy, to reflect culture, to express feelings and experience, and to bring enjoyment. Engagement with literary works is central to the course, but so is the exploration of literary language through creative and sometimes transactional writing. The learning outcomes that students will fulfill in this course, as specified by the provincial curriculum, are:
• Exploring thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences
• Comprehending and responding personally to oral, literary and media texts
• Managing ideas and information
• Enhancing the clarity and artistry of communication
• Celebrating and building community
The reading portion of the course can include short stories, novels, plays and poetry. Generally, reading material will be assigned literature for intensive study, although more extensive reading, chosen by the student, is also part of the course. Written assignments will include creative writing, responding to readings, summarizing, and explaining and supporting opinions. Related skills may include note-taking, organizing, critical thinking, spelling and vocabulary, and proofreading and editing. Development and use of computer skills will be encouraged in this course as equipment availability permits.
 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS: COMPREHENSIVE FOCUS GR 12
(ENGC4S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite: Grade 11 English Language Arts
Content: This course is designed to develop a student’s ability to apply accumulated language experiences to a range of “forms” such as:
• Literary forms (novels, short stories, poems, plays)
• Transactional forms (essays, articles, letters)
• Journalistic forms (newspapers, magazines, documentaries)
• Technical forms (memos, business letters, manuals)
• Media forms (newspaper, television, film/video)
Time will be spent instructing and practicing major skill areas such as listening, reading, speaking and writing. A provincially set written exam will be worth 30% of the course.
 
Note: Literature and Transactional Elective Courses in English Language can be divided into “Literary” and “Transactional”. There is no strict dividing line between the two, but the basic difference between them is a difference of purpose: literary language aims at an enhanced insight into ourselves and our world, and/or the satisfaction which comes from understanding a work of art, and/or simply amusement. Transactional language aims primarily to make something happen to bring about social or political change or to facilitate activities in business, science, government, sports, entertainment, etc.
As far as Language Arts courses are concerned, the difference between literary and transactional is also one of approach. Many of the same readings might be used in both courses, but would be studied in different ways. The literary approach would be to apply responses back into the reading itself, changing and expanding our response, then re-applying the new response, in a process that expands and deepens our understanding. In other words, the direction of thinking in the literary approach is always back into the text of the literature. The transactional approach is exactly the opposite. Our response to the reading is applied in the context of our “real life” knowledge and experience. Understanding is expanded and deepened, but the direction of thinking is outward from the reading, not inward. Both approaches offer equal challenge for in-depth, rewarding study. Both courses are specialized and designed in part as university preparation.
 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS: LITERARY FOCUS GR 12

(ENGL4S) – 1 credit
(Second Credit Elective)
Prerequisite: Grade 11 English Language Arts
Content: This specialized course focuses on literary texts with the aim of deepening and broadening students’ engagement with the literary uses of language: to enlighten, to foster understanding and sympathy, to reflect culture, to express feelings and experience, and to bring enjoyment. Exploration of literary texts through creative writing is also part of the course. Within this focus, students will meet the prescribed course outcomes for English Language Arts, which are:
• Exploring thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences
• Comprehending the responding personally to oral, literary and media texts
• Managing ideas and information
• Enhancing the clarity and artistry of communication
• Celebrating and building community
The reading portion of the course can include short stories, novels, plays and poetry. Generally, reading material will be assigned curriculum literature for intensive study, although more extensive reading, chosen by the student, may also be part of the course. Written assignments will include responding to readings, summarizing, and explaining and supporting opinions. Related skills may include note-taking, organizing, critical thinking, and proofreading and editing. Development and use of computer skills will be encouraged in this course as equipment availability permits. Students will produce an extensive personal portfolio as their final project in this course.
 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS: TRANSACTIONAL FOCUS GR12
(ENGT4S) – 1 credit
(Second Credit Elective)
Prerequisite: Grade 11 English Language Arts
Content: Transactional language aims at making things happen. The emphasis will be on these forms and purposes of language that relate to getting things done in the context of practical, professional and/or intellectual concerns. Research, editorials, exposés and publishing are all transactional activities. This elective will challenge students to present information in a clear concise way and to process information critically and efficiently. It will also encourage them to explore expression through alternative media (film, audio, advertising, etc.) The overall emphasis in discussion and assignments is on form and audience. Students will complete an extensive personal portfolio near graduation.
 
FRENCH GR 9
(FRER1G) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 8 French, or a willingness to learn
Content:  Learn one of Canada’s two official languages.  This course offers an introductory level to basic French skills.  The course is a thorough review of concepts covered in Grades 7 and 8.  The program is designed to help students attain an acceptable level of proficiency in the four basic skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing.  These skills are developed through simple materials in visually focused topical contexts that students can easily relate to their own experiences.  After establishing some key vocabulary and some of the basic sentence structures, students are asked easy-to-answer questions that require them to speak about their daily lives, express their opinions, and supply real information.  The Basic French program provides the skills necessary for further studies in French.
 
FRENCH GR 10
(FRER2G) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 9 French
Content:  Learn one of Canada’s two official languages.  This course is designed to continue the practice and development of basic French skills already acquired in Grade 9.  Students are required to complete four of the five units available.  Throughout the program, oral and written activities provide the opportunity for true communication, and to acquire more vocabulary and a greater understanding of French grammar.  The fundamental goal is to improve the student’s ability to communicate better in French.  Each lesson is structured to be completed in 69 to 70 minutes.  However, students may find that the length of time will vary depending on their past exposure to the French language.
 
FRENCH GR 11
(FRER3S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 10 French
Content:  In this course, the accent continues to be on the communicative aspect of the language.  The course material and strategies that are provided accommodate students of different ability levels.  Using the same approach as in French 20G, students in this course will also be expected to become more independent language learners seeking information, expressing themselves in the oral and written form, and self editing for content and grammar.
 
FRENCH GR 12
(FRER4S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 11 French
Content:  Choose basic French as course of study and give yourself the competitive edge in the new millennium.  The development of the theme in each unit is supported by interesting and motivating readings such as newspapers and magazine articles, biographies, and extracts from novels and short stories.  Communication skills continue to be developed and integrated with vocabulary and grammar.  The skills of reading and writing are the main focus in the language.
 
SPANISH GR 9
(SPAR1G) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  This course provides learning opportunities in the basic Spanish language arts: reading, writing, viewing, speaking, and listening.  The course is intended to assist students in developing basic oral and written communication skills.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to speak, comprehend, read, and write Spanish at a basic level of proficiency.  This course also introduces students to the history of Spanish culture, dance, piñata making and more.  Students will visit places of interest in the Spanish community (movie theatres, restaurants, etc.).
 
SPANISH GR 10
(SPAR2G) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  Students will use Spanish in a variety of situations and for a variety of purposes such as: express emotions and personal perspectives, impart and receive information, maintain interpersonal relationships, use the language for imaginative purposes and personal enjoyment, extend their knowledge of the world, and to use it in a real life situation.  Some of the units are:

1 - Greetings and personal information
2 – Family, food, personal description and professions
3 - Time and calendar
4 – Clothing, climate and body parts
5 - House, transportation, restaurant and traveling
6 – School
7 – Spanish culture, making piñatas
8 – Spanish countries 
Students will visit places of interest in the Spanish community (business, markets, restaurants, movie theatres, etc.) in order to acknowledge job opportunities.  By the end of this course the students should be able to listen, read, write, and speak at an intermediate level of proficiency.
 
SPANISH GR 11
(SPAR3S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 10 Spanish
Content:  Students are encouraged to interact with Spanish-speaking people as well as listen to Spanish songs, radio and television programs, and read additional material in Spanish to expand their opportunities to learn.  Something new that we have in the community is an organization called LACAM and the students can visit the website at www.lacam.ca for job opportunities.  Also, we have numerous requests for students who have Spanish knowledge for airline positions in Manitoba.  
 
SPANISH GR 12
(SPAR4S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 10 Spanish
Content:  Students will be able to:  share information, thoughts, opinions, preferences, emotions, and feelings; extend their knowledge of the world by gathering and organizing information by using their problem-solving skills, and by exploring opinions and values; use the language for personal enjoyment; and manage personal relationships.  Students will use a range of vocabulary and expressions in a variety of contexts. Students who are successful in this course will have an opportunity to register in a second level course at universities in Manitoba.  The opportunity of participating on a student exchange may be available.
 
SOCIAL STUDIES GR 9
(SOSR1F) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  This course examines some of the important events in Canada’s past and some of the current issues that face Canada.  Through historical research, presentation of current events and integration of primary and secondary sources, students build an understanding of Canadian society.  Through dialogue and reflection, students are encouraged to explore their attitudes and beliefs about these issues.  Some areas covered are Canadian identity, cultural diversity, government, economy, legal system, Canada in the global context including foreign policy, world wars and international aid and development.  Students will develop skills related to active citizenship, managing and communicating information and ideas and critical and creative thinking.

AMERICAN HISTORY GR 10
(HISR2G) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  Pierre Elliot Trudeau once referred to Canada’s relationship with the United States as   “sleeping next to an elephant.” He would go on to explain that no matter how friendly and even-tempered is the beast; one is affected by every twitch and grunt. The history of America is a story of heroic accomplishments and questionable decisions. It is the story of an ambitious group of people who have at times been too ambitious for their own good. The story of America is also the story of Canada, as it is in comparison to the Americans that so much of Canada finds its identity. 
The course will place heavy emphasis on the use of multiple intelligences and cooperative learning in both instruction and evaluation. Although the course is historic in its basis, it will draw upon all curriculums for its content.

GEOGRAPHY 21st Century GR 10
(GEOR2F) - 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 9 Social Studies
Content:  To be informed about the geographical issues facing this continent, the basic concepts of Geography as they relate to North America are examined in the first unit.  The remainder of the course is a study of the North American countries and regions and the geographical issues they face.  Some of these issues are global warming, depletion of the ozone layer, acid precipitation, the agricultural crisis, free trade, the crisis in the east coast fishery, forest preservation, and future  requirements.  Research and essay writing skills are developed as are map, graph, and diagram reading skills.
 
HISTORY OF CANADA GR 11
(HISR3F) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 10 Geography
Content:  Be prepared to take your place as an intelligent, well-informed citizen and be prepared for university studies in History and in related disciplines such as Political Studies, Sociology, and Economics.  This course will prepare you both for citizenship and for university.  Topics include - The First Peoples and New France, British North America, Becoming a Sovereign Nation, Achievements and Challenges, and Contemporary Canada.  Research and essay writing skills are developed, as are critical thinking skills.
 
SOCIOLOGY OF FOOTBALL GR 11
(SOFY3G) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  This School Initiated Course offers teachers a unique way to connect with students.  The sport of football is used as a vehicle to explore the history, economics and geography of our local, national and international community.  Students will explore such questions as; how is a football game similar to a chess match?  How are the differences between the United States and Canada reflected in their version of football?  And how can physics be used to explain the flight of a football?  Through this course students will gain a greater appreciation of the role that football and sport plays in a culture.
 
GLOBAL ISSUES GR 12
(GLIR4S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  Grade 11 History is strongly recommended
Content:  Would you like to better understand the political issues that dominate our world?  Would you like a course that prepares you to examine them in greater depth in university courses such as Political Studies, History, and Economics?  This course zeros in on the hot spots of the world, examines the factors that make them hot, and considers the role Canada is playing and should play in making the world a better place.  Research and essay writing skills are developed, as are critical thinking skills.  The skills of negotiation, compromise, diplomacy, and public speaking are developed.
 
LAW GR 12
(LAWR4S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  Law governs many aspects of our daily living.  These laws deal with crime, property, work and moral issues.  This course is an introduction to Canadian law, surveying the fundamentals of the legal system, covering such topics as the criminal code and capital punishment, youth crime, separation and divorce and legal and contractual rights.
 
PSYCHOLOGY GR 12
(PSYR4S) – 1 credit
Prerequisite:  None
Content:  Why do you think and act the way you do?  This course will analyze the main ideas and concepts associated with the human mind and human behaviour.  This includes topics such as: Abnormal Psychology, Adolescent Development, Sleep and Dreams, Social Psychology and many more.  Focus will be on researching topics, small group discussion, dream analysis, personal reflection and case study analysis.

 
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