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Spirit Naming Ceremony

What’s in a Name?

Saturday, February 18, 2017, seven students from General Wolfe School participated in an Indigenous ceremony at Circle of Life Thunderbird House to receive their Spirit Names.  Through the work of the school elder, Arlene Mitchell, the students were taught the importance and significance of Spirit Names.  As she said, this ceremony is a “rite of passage” among Indigenous young people.

Furrio Cardimone (Brown Bear) shared, “It’s a real privilege to get your Spirit Name.  Not everyone gets a chance to do that through a school.”

The ceremony was led by Elder Shannon Buck where with the use of sacred medicine, songs and traditional customs, each student sat in front of her to received their Spirit Names.  The significance of each name was explained as well as the job and duty that comes along with it.  To some of the students, it was an emotional experience.

“I was in tears because I was touched by what the elder explained about my name,” confided Corinna Keno (Spotted Eagle Woman).

We congratulate these students and mention their purpose in life:

Fast Running Wolf - leader that will lead from the back ensuring people in the community are

ok. Spotted Eagle Woman- flies high above and see from a far and will share her love to those in need. Brown Bear - a quite, curious individual who avoids confrontations but uses his wisdom to help others. Light Dancing on the Water - a bubbly, positive spirit who will shine the light to where there is darkness. Moon Child - will use dreams as messages to show us how to live our lives and with his connection to water, he will be a water protector.  Man Who Cries in the Wind - will use humour to uplift those who are down and will use his

knowledge of medicine to be a healer.  Calling Raven - will observe from above on what is going one and warn us of things that are coming and things we must do.

 

“I really like my name (Light Dancing on the Water) and I think it will show me my pathway in life,” explained Winter Armstrong.  “…it will give me a chance to find what I need to do in my life.”

 

The event was one of the many programs organized by the General Wolfe School’s Indigenous Education Committee.

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