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Grade 7 Homeroom 11 Mr. Nikkel

Mr. Nikkel has a Grade 7 Homeroom and teaches Grade 7 & 8 Supportive Math and Grade 7 Science. If parents/guardians wish to contact Mr. Nikkel he can be reached by phone at 204-586.9606 or by email: snikkel@wsd1.org
 
 

Grade 7 Math Supportive:​

NUMBER SENSE STRAND:  

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Determine and explain why a number is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10, and why a number cannot be divided by 0.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals to solve problems (for more than 1-digit divisors or 2-digit multipliers, technology will be used).
  • Solve problems involving percents from 1% to 100%.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between repeating decimals and fractions, and terminating decimals and fractions.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of adding and subtracting positive fractions and mixed numbers, with like and unlike denominators, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically (limited to positive sums and differences).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Compare and order fractions, decimals (to thousandths), and integers by using benchmarks, place value, equivalent fractions and/or decimals.

 

PATTERNS AND RELATIONS STRAND:

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of oral and written patterns and their corresponding relations.
  • Construct a table of values from a relation, graph the table of values, and analyze the graph to draw

    conclusions and solve problems.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of preservation of equality by modeling preservation of equality, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, applying preservation of equality to solve equations.
  • Explain the difference between an expression and an equation.
  • Evaluate an expression given the value of the variable(s).
  • Model and solve problems that can be represented by one-step linear equations of the form x + a = b, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a and b are integers.
  • Model and solve problems that can be represented by linear equations of the form    ax + b = c    ax = b                             x/a = b, a ≠ 0     concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a, b, and c are whole numbers.

SHAPE AND SPACE STRAND:

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of circles by describing the relationships among radius, diameter, and circumference of circles, relating circumference to pi (π), determining the sum of the central angles, constructing circles with a given radius or diameter, solving problems involving the radii, diameters, and circumferences of circles.
  • Develop and apply a formula for determining the area of triangles, parallelograms, and circles.
  • Perform geometric constructions, including perpendicular line segments, parallel line segments, perpendicular bisectors, and angle bisectors.
  • Identify and plot points in the four quadrants of a Cartesian plane using ordered pairs.
  • Perform and describe transformations of a 2-D shape in all four-quadrants of a Cartesian plane
  • (limited to integral vertices).

 

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY STRAND:

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of central tendency and range by determining the measures of central tendency (mean, median, mode) and range, determining the most appropriate measures of central tendency to report findings.
  • Determine the effect on the mean, median, and mode when an outlier is included in a data set.
  • Construct, label, and interpret circle graphs to solve problems.
  • Express probabilities as ratios, fractions, and percents.
  • Identify the sample space (where the combined sample space has 36 or fewer elements) for a probability experiment involving two independent events.
  • Conduct a probability experiment to compare the theoretical probability (determined using a tree diagram, table, or another graphic organizer) and experimental probability of two independent events.

 

HOMEWORK:

Any assignments that are not completed during class time are to be completed for homework. If your child does not have math homework they are encouraged to go over strategies to help them strengthen their own understanding or work on the memorization of the multiplication facts to 9x9.

Evaluation

Combined Term 1,2, and 3………………….......................................80%

Final Exam (June).........................................................................20%

Total 100%

Summative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

Assignments, Essential Skills Assessments, Quizzes, Unit Tests

Formative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

One on One Discussions, Student Self-Progress Reports, Observations, Exit Slips

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Grade 8 Math Supportive

NUMBER SENSE STRAND:

General Outcome:

-           To develop number sense

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of perfect squares and square roots, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically (limited to whole numbers).
  • Determine the approximate square root of whole numbers that are not perfect squares (limited to whole numbers).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of percents greater than or equal to 0%.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of ratio and rate.
  • Solve problems that involve rates, ratios, and proportional reasoning.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of multiplying and dividing positive fractions and mixed numbers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Solve problems involving positive rational numbers.

 

PATTERNS AND RELATIONS STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Use patterns to describe the world and solve problems.

-           Represent algebraic expressions in multiple ways.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Graph and analyze two-variable linear relations.
  • Model and solve problems that can be represented by linear equations

    concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a, b, and c are integers.

 

SHAPE AND SPACE STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Use direct or indirect measurement to solve problems.

-           Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them.

-           Describe and analyze position and motion of objects and shapes.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop and apply the Pythagorean theorem to solve problems.
  • Draw and construct nets for 3-D objects.
  • Determine the surface area of right rectangular prisms, right triangular prisms, and right cylinders

    to solve problems.
  • Develop and apply formulas for determining the volume of right prisms and right cylinders.
  • Draw and interpret top, front, and side views of 3-D objects composed of right rectangular prisms.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of tessellation by explaining the properties of shapes that make tessellating possible, creating tessellations, identifying tessellations in the environment.

 

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Collect, display, and analyze data to solve problems.

-           Use experimental or theoretical probabilities to represent and solve problems involving uncertainty.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Critique ways in which data are presented.
  • Solve problems involving the probability of independent events

 

HOMEWORK:

Any assignments that are not completed during class time are to be completed for homework. . If your child does not have math homework they are encouraged to go over strategies to help them strengthen their own understanding or work on the memorization of the multiplication facts to 9x9.

Evaluation

Combined Term 1,2, and 3………………….......................................80%

Divisional Final Exam (June).........................................................20%

Total 100%

Summative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

Assignments, Essential Skills Assessments, Quizzes, Unit Tests

Formative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

One on One Discussions, Student Self-Progress Reports, Observations, Exit Slips

 

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Grade 7 Science

CLUSTER 1: FORCES and STRUCTURES

General Overview:

In this cluster, students explore a variety of natural and human-built structures, and the forces that act on them. Students investigate internal and external forces acting on structures and recognize that these forces may affect structural strength and stability. Students identify common shapes used to increase strength and stability in structures, and methods used to enhance the strength of the materials used. The efficiency of a structure is assessed by comparing its mass with the mass of the load it supports. Students apply their understanding of forces and structures by evaluating the appropriateness of a specific structure's design, and by constructing a structure of their own that supports a given load and remains standing when a particular force is applied.

CLUSTER 2: EARTH'S CRUST

General Overview:

In this cluster, students investigate Earth's geology, including rock and mineral formation, changes in the landscape over time, and human use of geological resources. Students describe processes involved in the location, extraction, processing, and recycling of geological resources found in Manitoba and Canada. Students recognize that soil is an important natural resource and they discuss the importance of soil conservation. Students identify environmental, social, and economic factors that should be considered in making informed decisions about land use. They examine theories explaining the Earth's geology, and recognize the role of technology in the development of new scientific theories. Specialized careers involving the science and technology of the Earth's crust are also explored.

 

CLUSTER 3: PARTICAL THEORY of MATTER

General Overview:

In this cluster, students explore the nature of science by examining the development of scientific theories. One theory, the particle theory of matter, is investigated in detail. Students use the particle theory to describe changes of state, to differentiate between pure substances and mixtures, and to describe characteristics of solutions. An important distinction is made between heat and temperature. Students demonstrate how heat is transmitted by way of conduction, convection, and radiation. They plan and conduct experiments to identify substances that are good insulators and conductors of heat. They apply this knowledge through the design and construction of a prototype that controls the transfer of heat energy. Students also identify different forms of energy that can be transformed into heat energy, and recognize that heat is the most common by-product of other energy transformations. Students classify substances used in daily life as pure substances, mechanical mixtures, and solutions. They demonstrate different methods of separating the components of mixtures. Students experiment to determine factors that affect solubility. They describe the concentration of solutions in qualitative and quantitative terms, and demonstrate the differences between saturated and unsaturated solutions. The potential harmful effects of some substances on the environment are discussed, and methods to ensure safe use and disposal are identified.

CLUSTER 4: INTERACTIONS within ECOSYSTEMS

General Overview:

In this cluster, students investigate the complex interactions between organisms and their environment. Students identify biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, and analyze the cycling of matter that takes place within them. This includes an investigation of the transfer of energy that occurs at various consumer levels, the implications of the loss of producers and consumers to the transfer of energy, and the potential for bioaccumulation within an ecosystem. Students explore ecological succession and assess the positive and negative impacts of human interventions on this natural process. Students discuss environmental, social, and economic factors that should be considered in the management and preservation of ecosystems. They propose a course of action that would help protect the habitat of a particular organism. Students observe microorganisms with microscopes and discuss their beneficial and harmful roles. Students consider how knowledge of microorganisms has improved food production and preservation techniques.

HOMEWORK:

Any assignments that are not completed during class time are to be completed for homework.

COURSE OUTLINE:

Evaluation

Combined Term 1,2, and 3………………….......................................80%

Final Exam (June).........................................................................20%

Total 100%

Summative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

Assignments, Essential Skills Assessments, Quizzes, Unit Tests

Formative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

One on One Discussions, Student Self-Progress Reports, Observations, Exit Slips

 

 

 

 

 

 

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