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Grade 8 Homeroom 18 Mr. Pillay

Mr. Pillay is a Grade 8 Homeroom Teacher in Rm 18. He also teaches Grade 7 Math, Grade 8 Math and Grade 9 Science. He can be contacted by email: mpillay@wsd1.org or by calling; 204-586-9606

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Grade 7 Math

We will be following the Manitoba Math Curriculum for Grade 7 that includes the following four math strands:

NUMBER SENSE STRAND:  

General Outcome:

-           To develop number sense

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Determine and explain why a number is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10, and why a number cannot be divided by 0.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals to solve problems (for more than 1-digit divisors or 2-digit multipliers, technology will be used).
  • Solve problems involving percents from 1% to 100%.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between repeating decimals and fractions, and terminating decimals and fractions.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of adding and subtracting positive fractions and mixed numbers, with like and unlike denominators, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically (limited to positive sums and differences).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Compare and order fractions, decimals (to thousandths), and integers by using benchmarks, place value, equivalent fractions and/or decimals.

 

PATTERNS AND RELATIONS STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Use patterns to describe the world and solve problems.

-           Represent algebraic expressions in multiple ways.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of oral and written patterns and their corresponding relations.
  • Construct a table of values from a relation, graph the table of values, and analyze the graph to draw conclusions and solve problems.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of preservation of equality by modeling preservation of equality, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, applying preservation of equality to solve equations.
  • Explain the difference between an expression and an equation.
  • Evaluate an expression given the value of the variable(s).
  • Model and solve problems that can be represented by one-step linear equations of the form x + a = b, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a and b are integers.
  • Model and solve problems that can be represented by linear equations of the form    ax + b = c , ax = b, x/a = b, a ≠ 0     concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a, b, and c are whole numbers.

SHAPE AND SPACE STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Use direct or indirect measurement to solve problems.

-           Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them.

-           Describe and analyze position and motion of objects and shapes.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of circles by describing the relationships among radius, diameter, and circumference of circles, relating circumference to pi (π), determining the sum of the central angles, constructing circles with a given radius or diameter, solving problems involving the radii, diameters, and circumferences of circles.
  • Develop and apply a formula for determining the area of triangles, parallelograms, and circles.
  • Perform geometric constructions, including perpendicular line segments, parallel line segments, perpendicular bisectors, and angle bisectors.
  • Identify and plot points in the four quadrants of a Cartesian plane using ordered pairs.
  • Perform and describe transformations of a 2-D shape in all four-quadrants of a Cartesian plane       (limited to integral vertices).

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Collect, display, and analyze data to solve problems.

-           Use experimental or theoretical probabilities to represent and solve problems involving uncertainty.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of central tendency and range by determining the measures of central tendency (mean, median, mode) and range, determining the most appropriate measures of central tendency to report findings.
  • Determine the effect on the mean, median, and mode when an outlier is included in a data set.
  • Construct, label, and interpret circle graphs to solve problems.
  • Express probabilities as ratios, fractions, and percents.
  • Identify the sample space (where the combined sample space has 36 or fewer elements) for a probability experiment involving two independent events.
  • Conduct a probability experiment to compare the theoretical probability (determined using a tree diagram, table, or another graphic organizer) and experimental probability of two independent events.

 

As students acquire the specified outcomes, they will also be expected to use the following Seven Mathematical Processes:

(1) Communicate in order to learn and express their understanding.

(2) Connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences.

(3) Demonstrate fluency with mental mathematics and estimation.

(4) Develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.

(5) Develop mathematical reasoning.

(6) Select and use technologies as tools for learning and solving problems.

(7) Develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections, and solving problems.

HOMEWORK:

Any assignments that are not completed during class time are to be completed for homework. If your child does not have math homework they are encouraged to go over strategies to help them strengthen their own understanding such as review that day's lesson or create questions they can share with a classmate.

COURSE OUTLINE:

September                                                                                                     -Graphing Coordinates                                                                                   

October                                                                                                         

-Decimal Numbers                                                                                           -Order of Operations

November                                                                                                     

-Fractions, Decimals and Percentages                                                           

-Patterns and Expressions                                                                             

December

-Fractions and Operations

-Probability

January

-Solving Equations

February

-Geometry and Measurement

March

-Adding and Subtracting integers

 April

-Circles

May

-Adding and Subtracting Fractions

June

-Working with Data

-Review

REQUIRED

Workbooks: provided by teacher.

Materials: binder (for notes and practice assignments), duo-tang, lined paper, pencils and erasers, calculator, geometry set, graph paper.

Evaluation

Combined Term 1,2, and 3………………….......................................80%

Final Exam (June).........................................................................20%

Total 100%

Summative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

Assignments, Essential Skills Assessments, Quizzes, Unit Tests

Formative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

One on One Discussions, Student Self-Progress Reports, Observations, Exit Slips

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Grade 8 Math Course

 

We will be following the Manitoba Math Curriculum for Grade 8 that includes the following four math strands:

 

NUMBER SENSE STRAND:

General Outcome:

-           To develop number sense

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of perfect squares and square roots, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically (limited to whole numbers).
  • Determine the approximate square root of whole numbers that are not perfect squares (limited to whole numbers).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of percents greater than or equal to 0%.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of ratio and rate.
  • Solve problems that involve rates, ratios, and proportional reasoning.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of multiplying and dividing positive fractions and mixed numbers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.
  • Solve problems involving positive rational numbers.

PATTERNS AND RELATIONS STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Use patterns to describe the world and solve problems.

-           Represent algebraic expressions in multiple ways.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Graph and analyze two-variable linear relations.
  • Model and solve problems that can be represented by linear equations of the form ax = b , ax + b = c      x/a  + b = c, a ≠0 , a(x +b) =  x/a + b = c,

      a ≠ 0

concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, where a, b, and c are integers.

SHAPE AND SPACE STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Use direct or indirect measurement to solve problems.

-           Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them.

-           Describe and analyze position and motion of objects and shapes.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

  • Develop and apply the Pythagorean theorem to solve problems.
  • Draw and construct nets for 3-D objects.
  • Determine the surface area of right rectangular prisms, right triangular prisms, and right cylinders

    to solve problems.
  • Develop and apply formulas for determining the volume of right prisms and right cylinders.
  • Draw and interpret top, front, and side views of 3-D objects composed of right rectangular prisms.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of tessellation by explaining the properties of shapes that make tessellating possible, creating tessellations, identifying tessellations in the environment.

 

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY STRAND:

General Outcomes:

-           Collect, display, and analyze data to solve problems.

-           Use experimental or theoretical probabilities to represent and solve problems involving uncertainty.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

 

  • Critique ways in which data are presented.
  • Solve problems involving the probability of independent events

 

As students acquire the specified outcomes, they will also be expected to use the following  Seven Mathematical Processes:

(1) Communicate in order to learn and express their understanding.

(2) Connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences.

(3) Demonstrate fluency with mental mathematics and estimation.

(4) Develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.

(5) Develop mathematical reasoning.

(6) Select and use technologies as tools for learning and solving problems.

(7) Develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections, and solving problems.

 

HOMEWORK:

Any assignments that are not completed during class time are to be completed for homework. If your child does not have math homework they are encouraged to go over strategies to help them strengthen their own understanding such as review that day's lesson or create questions they can share with a classmate.

COURSE OUTLINE

NUMBERS

Unit 1: Perfect Squares and Square Roots and Pythagorean Theorem (September)

Unit 2: Fractions (October)

Unit 3: Percent

Unit 4: Integers

Unit 5: Ratio, Rates and Proportional Reasoning

PATTERNS AND RELATIONS

Unit 1: Linear Relations

Unit 2: Solving Linear Equations

SHAPE AND SPACE

Unit 1: Tessellations

Unit 2: Volume

Unit 3: 3-D Objects and Surface Area

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY

Unit 1: Representing Data

Unit 2: Probability

COURSE REVIEW/EXAM PREP

REQUIRED

Workbooks: provided by teacher.

Materials: binder (for notes and practice assignments), duo-tang, lined paper, pencils and erasers, calculator, geometry set, graph paper.

Evaluation

Combined Term 1,2, and 3………………….......................................80%

Divisional Final Exam (June).........................................................20%

Total 100%

Summative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

Assignments, Essential Skills Assessments, Quizzes, Unit Tests

 

Formative assessments during the terms may consist of the following:

One on One Discussions, Student Self-Progress Reports, Observations, Exit Slips

 

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Course:  Grade 9 Science 93 (SCIR1F)

 Teacher: Mr. Pillay

Course Description:

Grade 9 will study the following four unit: Reproductions, Atoms and elements, Electricity, and Astronomy.

In the reproduction unit the students will compare asexual and sexual methods of reproduction. They will learn how the human reproductive system functions and recognize the major stages of human development from conception to birth. Students will recognize that the nucleus of the cell contains the genetic information and is responsible for the transmission of traits from one generation to the next. Also discuss factors that may change a cell's genetic information. Students will get opportunity to address current biotechnology issue from the knowledge gained throughout the course.

The atoms and elements unit students will learn about the development of the atomic model and the periodic table. Students will investigate the properties of elements and compounds and acquaint themselves with chemical symbols and families. Also the will become familiar with natural phenomena and everyday technologies that demonstrate chemical change.

The electricity unit students will construct an electrophorus to investigate electrostatic phenomena. The transition from static to current electricity will enable students to investigate series and parallel circuits and to make connections to daily applications like cost of electrical energy and the safety and efficiency of electrical appliances. They will use the decision-making process to address an issue associated with the generation and transmission of electricity in Manitoba.

In the astronomy unit students will observe and locate visible celestial objects. This knowledge provides them with an appreciation for the relevance of astronomy to various people. They will develop an understanding of the origin, evolution, and components of the universe. Also explain how various technologies have extended our ability to explore and understand space.

 Students in this course will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to further succeed in later high school courses such as physics, chemistry, and biology.

Class expectations: Students are expected are to attend school and classes regularly and punctually. They will bring all supplies that are required to complete assignments. All assignments are to be handed in on time usually the next day but no later than three days. Homework should be completed and bring to class the next day. If students need  help to complete their assignments they are encouraged to attend assignment catch periods(ACU) or resource periods. Safety in the the science lab and classroom should be practiced at all times.

 

Assessment and Evaluation:

Student marks are distributed as follows:

Assignments:                                   60%

Tests and Quizzes:                         20%

Final Exam:                                       20%

Total:                                                 100%

 

 

 

 

2014-2015 Class Work

Students in Mr. Pillay’s grade 9 science class completed their study of the relationship among DNA, chromosomes, genes, and the expression of traits. They were able to compare DNA between different people and explain how DNA is used in certain professions such as medicine and criminology. They were able to make their own model of DNA when given a sequence of a DNA strand. Furthermore, the students were able to extract DNA during a laboratory experiment.

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